IRS IP PIN Program Continues in Florida, Georgia, and the District of Columbia

Now that W-2s are available and you are preparing to file your taxes (if you haven’t already done so), remember that an IP PIN from the IRS is available to help you guard against tax filing fraud.

irsThe PIN is a six-digit number assigned by the IRS to eligible taxpayers to help prevent the misuse of their Social Security numbers on fraudulent federal income tax returns. The IP PIN is not the 5-digit e-File PIN, and cannot be used for that purpose.

Important: You currently cannot “opt-out” once you get an IP PIN. You must use an IP PIN to confirm your identity on all federal tax returns you file this year and in subsequent tax years. If you e-file your return and your IP PIN is missing or incorrect, the IRS will reject your tax return.

To get an IP PIN, you must verify your identity online. You will need to have immediate access to your email account to receive a confirmation code.  If you are eligible, you will receive your IP PIN online once the IRS verifies your identity. The IRS will send you a new IP PIN by postal mail each year in late December or early January.

Eligibility

You must get an IP PIN to file your current or prior year returns in 2016 if:

  • You received a CP01A Notice from the IRS with your new IP PIN and you lost it, or
  • You had an IP PIN in a prior tax year and you didn’t receive a new one this year, or
  • Your e-filed return was rejected because your IP PIN was missing or incorrect

 You may choose to get an IP PIN if:

  • You received an IRS letter inviting you to “opt-in” to get an IP PIN, or
  • You filed your 2015 federal tax return with an address in Florida, Georgia, or the
    District of Columbia

 Users who choose to get an IP PIN must do so using the IRS online IP PIN system at https://www.irs.gov/Individuals/Get-An-Identity-Protection-PIN

This program is not limited to identity theft victims. The main purpose is to add an additional layer of protection for taxpayers who live in areas where tax-related identity theft is more prevalent. Visit FAQs about the IP PIN for more information.